Coyote Population Control Needed – In and Out of Collingwood

Coyote population needs to be controlled. This is natural and legal. If predators such as bears, wolves or disease or coyotes killing themselves are not effective controls then hunting and trapping is permitted by law and a necessity. Problem is the laws have not evolved to address growing concerns and incidents with urban coyotes and coywolves. Population data on coyote incidents (attacks, near attacks, bites, killings) are questionable 0 who is compiling this and for what reasons.

Unfortunately recent rules/policies mandated by MNRF (Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry) have contributed to the coyote population problem. A ban on coyote hunting North of Collingwood as been put in place to protect the dwindling Algonquin wolf population. The impact of this policy is over population of coyotes which for territorial reasons are moving South to urban centers such as Collingwood – for protection from other coyotes/coywolves. More problems to come our way.

Unfortunately the MNRF are relied on by the the Town of Collingwood (or finger pointing at the MNRF) to control coyote population or to solve the increasing problem we are facing in Collingwood. The MNRF does not trap or hunt coyotes but they set laws/guidelines for others to hunt and trap coyotes with the hopes that a balanced population will be the outcome. (ideally keep coyotes in the wild to thrive naturally) This may seem cruel to some but it is the law and it is necessary. The outcome of the questionable protection of a wolf species (recent name change to the Algonquin wolf) is an excess population of coyotes. Misguided policy now effects our safety in cities such as Collingwood.

The MNRF solution to the problem is coexistence education in urban centers with the support of Coyote Watch Canada and municipal funded programs for awareness of coyotes and preventative measures.  (the problem is here – so learn to deal with it) These government funded campaigns are intended to educate people to coexist with coyotes, accept the attacks and killings of dogs as normal wild animal behavior and when people are attacked by coyotes quiet actions will be taken to destroy the “problem” coyote(s) if they can locate it and distinguish it from the many coyotes in the area. Interesting issue is then someone (Town or OPP) has to approve a reactive safety measure of trapping or shooting coyotes in Collingwood. It does not appear this will happen with dog attacks but possibly with attacks on residents.

This looks like a common government mistake and mismanagement case with very high stakes and with more resources being spent trying to distract from the real problem of over population of coyotes. These coyotes are now making their homes in urban centers while creating risks to pets and residents of cities such as Collingwood. A recent attack of an older defenseless women walking her dog in Markham helps residents understand the risks (hopefully communicate this to government and police). The government recommended solution of resident education is designed to hopefully allow our streets to be turned over to wild animals as we are taught to avoid/prevent encounters with them. This seems to be the reverse of what cities should be – safe streets occupied by residents and pets on leashes and children safely playing outside on private properties and in public parks.

To make matters worse some people believe coyotes will not hurt them and that they are  the blame for attracting coyotes to our properties by having pets, pet poop or pet food,compose on our residential properties. This is a campaign to push the blame on the victims of ineffective government policy and poor leadership in the area of public safety. Residents are not the root of the problem attracting coyotes to Collingwood. (now that the coyotes are here some residents are more likely to have them show up on their streets and properties)

Government policy has created a situation for wild animals with no predators to roam at large in Collingwood. The presence of coyotes contravenes and contradicts the principles and intent of the laws we have in place to protect us and our pets from threats and nuisance from animals.

It is difficult to understand or accept why coyotes are allowed to be hunted and trapped in the wild but once they enter a city such as Collingwood they are protected from being removed. (hunting is not acceptable and trapping is extremely difficult) It appears that political pressure against hurting wild animals (coyotes)  wins over resident pressure (difficult to mount) to prevent coyotes from roaming at large and attacking and  killing our pets and risking the safety of people as coyotes roam at large in Collingwood.

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

References:

https://news.ontario.ca/mnr/en/2016/11/new-hunting-rules-for-coyotes-and-wolves.html

https://www.ofah.org/2016/09/emotion-wins-over-science-in-wolfcoyote-ban/

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sudbury/wolves-coyotes-hunting-trapping-ban-ontario-1.4536456

https://www.mykawartha.com/news-story/6805111-council-doesn-t-support-province-s-proposal-to-ban-wolf-and-coyote-hunting-and-trapping/

https://fur.ca/conservation/coyote-population-and-management-in-canada/

Wolf & Coyote Hunting and Trapping Ban

http://www.steubencourier.com/sports/20180311/strongcoyote-attack-bellwether-for-game-managementstrong

 

Coyote Attack on Six Year Old Boy in a City Park

In a news reported story below  a six year old boy was attacked and bitten by a coyote while playing in a park near his home. Coyotes were latter trapped as the park was later closed and traps were set in the area to try and catch the coyote – four coyotes were trapped over two days.

The sad part of the story is not only the tragedy of the young child being dragged by the coyote and bitten but that the long term solution by government officials (wildlife representatives)  is recommendations to be aware of coyotes in the area. “Do not leave small children or pets outside unattended.” The father was on the other end of the play ground at the time of the attack. The government wants to educate on coexistence and I can only imagine as a parent what the father wanted and other parents.

In Collingwood we have have had frequent sighting of coyotes at a public park on Georgian Manor Dr. The Town of Collingwood response is a commitment to post a sign to be aware of coyotes in the area? Should we not take this threat seriously and take preventative steps?

Resident emails of immediate threat in area

https://www.mercurynews.com/2016/10/14/california-town-on-edge-after-boy-6-attacked-by-coyote/

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

Will it Take a Persons Death for Action with Coyotes in Cities

An unfortunate case in point is a near attack by a coyote on a lady walking her small dog in Markham, Ontario January 11, 2018.

https://www.cp24.com/news/i-m-done-for-today-woman-scares-off-coyote-while-walking-dog-in-markham-1.3756232

Nothing appears to have changed because of this incident. The Town of Markham website does not make mention of coyote concerns. The lesson learned from this incident for the City officials is the need for education of residents  on how to scare away a coyote if it approaches you on the streets of Markham. Is that the best the City of Markham can do for the lady that was growled at and almost attacked by a coyote. This appears to be the same approach in Collingwood as we had a recent media reported attack on a dog (Town controls the reported coyote incidents).

If the coyote had killed the Markham lady’s dog; it appears nothing would be done – just another teaching moment to coexist. If the coyote bit the woman during the attack on her dog it is not clear what would have been done. The lady would have been blamed for not properly hazing the coyote or that particular coyote is a problem coyote which may warrant action – if they can find it or distinguish that coyote between it and the many in the area.

The actions by cities are to call in Coyote Watch Canada “CWC” and educate people on how to manage the conflict with coyotes with the  goal of coexistence.  To tell us it is unlikely that coyotes will harm us but small pets are at risk so change your lives and rights to freedom and safely to allow coyotes to roam at large. The Town of Collingwood is organizing a Coyote Watch Canada information session.

The women above screamed at the coyote, through snow at it and the coyote growled at her. How effective is the Coyote Watch education in this case. CWC will say small dogs are at risk so you are best to keep them inside away from coyotes. Is it not reasonable for this lady or any resident in a city such as Collingwood to be able to go for a walk with your dog and not be growled at by a wild animal, or have your dog attacked by a coyote. In Collingwood, there are packs of three coyotes in one area (Georgina Manor Drive) and a pack of seven in another (Sunset Point). It is logical that the risks are higher. This situation may not be in the stats of Coyote Watch Canada – and many of these sightings are not being reported to help form reliable information. This may be a growing concern which the government is slow to react to. It may take a human tragedy to understand the level of concern needed to take action to prevent coyote attacks.

Are our public parks areas safe accordingly to Coyote Watch Canada stats. If a pack of three wild coyotes frequent a park in Collingwood such as the Nip Spooner park on Georgian Manor Drive; are we suppose to accept the stats that it is unlikely they will attack children. Attacks have happened but it is uncommon according to Coyote Watch Canada so we should coexist with coyotes in our parks? Would any responsible parent take the assurances of Coyote Watch Canada stats (mandated to protect coyotes) and put their children near an area with wild unpredictable animals looking for food. The education of strategies to possibly save a child’s live are helpful but advocating that the long term strategy is to coexist is negligent as we are waiting for a tragedy to update the stats and take action.

If these coyotes were on a farm property around livestock; farmers would shoot them which is permitted by Ontario law. If coyotes kill livestock the Ontario government has a Wildlife Damage Compensation Program to compensate farmers. There is a staff of Ontario government officials that review reports of livestock to determine if the farmer should be paid. Ontario tax payers are paying millions of dollars for damages by wild animals such as coyotes. The federal government is funding Coyote Watch Canada coexistence education. There is no money available to Collingwood residents to prevent our coyote concerns. Residents have to fund action. It is difficult to compete and succeed with all the government resources focused on coexistence which now includes the Town of Collingwood which does not deal with wildlife.

Why doesn’t Coyote Watch educate farmers to coexist with coyotes?  Would farmers accept this as the solution to their coyote concerns? Should farmers be expected to; stand tall, make noises and walk backwards (day and night) and/or train their livestock to co-exist with coyotes like our children and small doges  are expected to. Should farmers keep their livestock inside and away from coyotes to allow coyotes to roam at large on farms? (or build higher fences as MNRF recommends) We all know what farmers would say if the Town of Collingwood called a Coyote Watch Canada meeting to educate them on coexisting with coyotes.  It would be interesting to have farmers attend the planned Coyote Watch Canada meeting in Collingwood.

Why is there a double standard in which coyotes in cities can attack and kill our dogs without action by Police or Town staff while they are killed regularly in rural areas to protect property such as livestock.  Why does the Town of Collingwood and our OPP services not protect our dogs, streets and parks from wild animals roaming at large?  The point is not to suggest we start shooting coyotes in parks and streets but rather address coyote concerns with an action plan to prevent coyotes from entering these areas in cities such as Collingwood.

Why are we waiting for more attacks on people? Why do we not manage the unpredictable and deadly risk of coyotes  by eliminating it in cities vs telling us to prevent contact with coyotes in our daily lives or to change our daily lives in Collingwood to allow coyotes to roam at large while we take cover?

Are coyotes more intelligent then our government policy makers? Coyotes realize they can roam at large in cities with out harm from predators (wolves and bears) and humans are defenseless noisy potential prey; therefore they have found a new home with no taxes, free food and very little law to stop them doing what they want to do or where they want to roam. Looks like coyotes have it figured out at the envy of people – and terror of people.

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

References;

coyote watch email and response

Resident emails of immediate threat in area

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/predation/tips_producer.htm

Predation and Ontario’s Wildlife Damage Compensation Program

 

Animal Control By-laws Are Not Being Applied to Coyotes?

Animal Control by-laws are in effect in Collingwood to some extent;

The Animal Control by-laws of Collingwood are not being enforced in the case of coyotes. As you read the  BY-LAW No. 2012-016, which is the Animal By-law passed in 2012. (at a time before the current coyote concerns) you will realize that laws are in effect to protect residents and dogs in Collingwood except in the case of coyotes which appear to have an exempt status based the failure to act issue we are facing. There appears to be political pressure from potential public outcry for not harming coyotes which are breaking the laws which are in place to protect residents and dogs. Why is there not public outcry to use the laws to protect us? Please get engaged in this issue.

In essence dogs can not;

  1. run at large,
  2. bite other dogs,
  3. emit sounds to disturb inhabitants of the Town of Collingwood

The Town of Collingwood can;

  1. shoot an animal under the animal by-law and under the firearms by-law. Collingwood Firearms bylaw if it is a threat or nuisance.
  2. impound or otherwise restrain and detain all dogs running at large.

Residents can not keep candis species (coyotes) but the Town of Collingwood allows them on Town Property  and roaming around Collingwood.

Coyotes commonly attack small dogs. We have had reported dog attacks and missing cats. Unfortunately there is a conflict as this information is likely reported to the Town of Collingwood and OPP who are not taking action. One media reported story proves coyotes attacked a dog in Collingwood. https://www.simcoe.com/community-story/8097745-collingwood-dog-attacked-by-coyotes/ In this reported case the Animal Control by-law of Collingwood was not acted on – no action was taken.

Complaints of disturbances, threat or nuisance (covered under the firearms by-law) have not been acted on.

Examples of a resident complaints which were not acted on under our rights of protection under Collingwood by-laws.

Resident emails of immediate threat in area

The Town of Collingwood has been aware of numerous infractions of by-laws which they refuse to act on.

Town of Collingwood reqest of Action 02-26-2018

What do we do when the Town of Collingwood will not act on by-laws and/or contravenes by-laws???

  1. The interesting issue becomes who to ask for the Collingwood by-laws to be enforced when the Town refuses. The Ombuds Office of Ontario has bee approached given their recent oversight of Municipalities. Ombuds Ontario complaint 02-28-2018
  2. Sign a  petition to put public pressure on the Town of Collingwood.
  3. Contact a Town of Collingwood Councilor.
  4. Email the Town of Collingwood Clerk (salmas@collingwood.ca) who oversees the by-law department (interesting issue)

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

Reference materials;

http://www.collingwood.ca/node/6200

http://www.collingwood.ca/files/2012-016%20Animal%20Control_0.pdf

“animal” means any member of the animal kingdom, other than a human
“animal sound” means any sound emitted from an animal which is audible at property
occupied by persons other than the owner of the animal emitting the sound. Without
limitation, this term shall include barking, whimpering, whining, howling, yowling and
yelping, meowing, crying
“at large” means where an animal is found in a place other than the property of the
owner of the animal and not under the control of the owner of the animal or their
authorized representative, except where the owner of the property permits the animal to
be on their property

3.0 GENERAL PROVISIONS
3.1 This by-law pertains to animals being housed, harboured, kept or owned by any person
in the Town of Collingwood.

4.0 CAUSING A DISTURBANCE
4.1 No person shall cause, permit or allow an animal to emit animal sounds or other noise
for an extended or frequent period of time, which disturbs, or is likely to disturb the
inhabitants of the Town of Collingwood.

11.0 DOG BITES OR ATTACKS
11.1 Where a dog has bitten or attacked any person or domestic animal, or is alleged to have
bitten or attacked any person or domestic animal, the Municipal Law Enforcement
Officer or other duly appointed officer may issue an Order to the owner of the dog
requiring that the dog be kept muzzled and any other conditions deemed expedient by
the Officer at such times as are set out in the Order. Such Order shall set out the
conditions and the owner of the dog shall comply with all conditions of the Order. The
Order shall remain in effect until an action under the provisions of the Dog Owners’
Liability Act has concluded or until it is deemed by the Municipal Law Enforcement
Officer or other duly appointed officer that the dog in question is otherwise innocent of
such a bite or attack.

11.2 Where a dog has bitten or attacked any person or domestic animal, a proceeding may
be commenced by the Town against the owner of the dog to seek an Order of the Court
necessary for the protection of the public under the provisions of the Dog Owners’
Liability Act, R.S.O. 1990, c. D.16 and any amendments thereto.

12.0 SEIZING AND IMPOUNDING

12.2 It shall be the duty of the Municipal Law Enforcement Officer or other duly appointed
officer, to impound or otherwise restrain and detain all dogs running at large pursuant to
this by-law and,

15.2 Where an animal other than a dog, is, in the opinion of the Municipal Law Enforcement
Officer or other duly appointed officer, believed to be rabid and is believed to be a
danger or threat of danger to the safety of any person as a result of suspected rabies,
the Municipal Law Enforcement Officer or other duly appointed officer may immediately
kill the animal without notifying any person or without permitting any person to reclaim
the animal or without offering it for sale. No damages or compensation shall be
recovered by the owner or any other person on account of its killing regardless of
whether the results of any rabies tests are positive or not.

18.0 PROHIBITED ANIMALS
18.1 No person shall own, harbour, possess, keep, sell or offer for sale any animal listed
below as a pet or for any other purpose or for any period of time.
a) all non-human primates (such as gorillas and monkeys);
b) all felids, except the domestic cat;
c) all canids, except the domestic dog;

Coyote Attacks on Pets Acceptable Behavior Accordingly to Toronto Animal Services

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2017/03/02/city-urges-caution-for-busy-coyote-season-in-toronto.html

According to reports of the Toronto Star – Toronto Animal Services says it will remove a coyote from a populated area if it is sick or injured or has attacked a human. But the city deems coyote attacks on other animals, even pets, to be “natural coyote behaviour.”

Surprising and shocking that domestic pets which people treat like family are allowed to be attacked and possibly killed without action accordingly to Toronto Animal Services.

The current Ontario hunting laws allow coyotes to be hunted. If a coyote enters a private rural property such as a farm and the farmer feels/realizes his livestock is threatened; he/she can shoot the coyote. On a residential property in Collingwood, if a coyote attacks a dog or threatens to attack a dog; the Town of Collingwood or OPP will not take action. In this case the resident can trap the coyotes. (difficult to trap on a residential property in a city)

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

Motion Tripped Camera for Coyote Traffic

It is helpful to identify that you in fact do have coyotes on your property, the time of day and frequency.  It is most common for them to hunt a night but we have seen them day and night in Collingwood. This is especially useful for trapping strategies as you will want to identify the path coyotes take regularly. Apparently they keep to the same path which they have determined to be safe.

The camera below is on clearance sale at Canadian Tire for $200.00. In addition you will need a standard size SD Card and 4 AA batteries.

 

 

Coyote Watch Canada Fails to Share the Facts on Risks from Coyotes

Coyote Watch Canada is a Federal Not-For-Profit community-based, wildlife organization which advocates positive human wildlife experiences. Problem is that  they will not acknowledge the actual incidents with coyotes or the non positive experiences humans and pets are having with coyotes or the devastation of enjoyable wildlife by coyotes (dangerous wildlife).

The educator of positive experiences needs to be educated on the reality that coyotes have killed people, are attacking people and dogs in urban areas. This is much more the leaving dog poop or dog food in our yards as coyotes are roaming at large and attacking on public streets. This is a serious matter which requires serious actions to prevent the risks from coyotes in cities where human and pets expect safety from wild animals.

Coyote Watch uses a formula of a hoax investigation of a resident who is allegedly feeding coyotes. This shifts the blame of coyote over population or coyote incidents to blame residents.

Coyote Watch Canada is not receptive of being told the real facts;

coyote watch email and response

If Coyote Watch Canada is coming soon to your community such as Collingwood; please advise them of the facts. – listing of a few coyote incidents.

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

Coyotes Access Backyards with Fences

Coyotes can access our fenced backyards.

Hopefully you are aware that coyotes consider small dogs as prey. Please also be aware that coyotes can get over a standard residential fence creating risks for your dogs and children.

The following email from the MNRF advises us that “Coyote conflict with dogs are a fairly common occurrence in urban areas. It is not uncommon for habituated coyotes to go after small dogs”.

What is confusing is the statement “Generally speaking the presence of coyotes in urban area does not pose a dangerous situation or threat to public safety. However, coyotes are wild animals and should be treated accordingly”.

Therefore coyotes are dangerous, they commonly attack our dogs but by the MNRF standards are not a threat to public safety?

We expect a higher standard of safety in Collingwood.

MNRF email 02-21-2018 coyote concerns_0001

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Jeff Brown

Coyote Concerns Collingwood – Argument for Action – Launch

A Facebook Group and website have been launched recently to help address the coyote concerns in Collingwood as action has not been taken by the Town of Colingwood or OPP Collingwood.

Correspondence and website links from OPP, Town of Collingwood, Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Coyote Watch Canada  have been provided to help educate residents and visitors to Collingwood . We have tried to share a conflicting view and identify the concerns that these stakeholders are not taking action on to prevent the risks people and pets are facing in Collingwood.

The unfortunate reality is that the coyote concerns are difficult for government and police to deal with. The harming of animals is not accepable to many. When a dog is attacked or killed or when a person is attacked or killed the public outcry should swing to removing the coyotes from roaming at large in Collingwood.  The Town of Collingwood is waiting for this happen before they will act on existing by-laws to remove the threat and nuisance of coyotes. The OPP will act once an inevitable incident occurs but unfortunately they will be too late. They will then do what we are asking them to do which is remove the threat. The OPP made an unfortunate error in 2015 in which they shot a dog mistaken to be a coyote and are now reluctant to shot or destroy coyotes in Collingwood. The risk of making an error creates an unsafe situation for residents, visitor and pets,

An argument is being made  that we have destroyed the habitat of coyotes which explains why they are moving into our cities. We have but many of us in Collingwood are not the ones who developed the coyote habitat or approved the development without properly relocating coyotes or dealing with the consequences of their lost habitat. It should not be thrust into the yards and streets of Collingwood with no action other then a weak coexistence strategy while it is being demonstrated that people and dogs are getting attached by coyotes in urban centers (see reported cases)

An argument is being made that we should not harm coyotes. Most people would agree that we should not harm animals. Any reasonable person would agree that an animal that attacks or kills people and dogs should not be allowed to roam at large in Collingwood. The problem is people are not being informed properly on the risks. Coyotes are unpredictable wild animals. The protection the coyotes deserve in the wild should be different then in cites.

An argument is being made that other cities have the same concerns with coyotes and are just educating people to coexist and trying to deal with problem coyotes.  The problem is that information is not being shared on attacks and killings to make informed decisions.   Who is compiling and sharing this information? What is a problem coyote? In Collingwood packs of coyotes are in residential areas daily in the day and night. That may not be considered a problem through the eyes of the Town of Collingwood or OPP but it is for residents who are scared for themselves and their pets. Coyotes are attacking small dogs and people in other cities. Coyotes have attacked dogs in Collingwood. We have notified the OPP in Collingwood and Town of Collingwood Clerk that this is happening and can happen in Collingwood. The MNRF and Coyote Watch Canada are misleading governments, police and residents that coyotes are “unlikely” to harm people and to keep blaming people if an attack does happen.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/coyote-attacks-suspected-north-of-toronto-as-2-women-bitten-1.2686276

Collingwood Response to Request for Action Coyotes 03-02-2018

OPP Response to Take Action 02-28-2018_0001

Resident emails of immediate threat in area_0001

Action needs to be taken ASAP? If the Town of Collingwood and OPP will not act then residents will have to.

Unfortunately ii is the residents and pets who are being harmed by the presence of coyotes. We are asked to be more careful in our community without any action to remove the threat.  We are ones losing pets or fearful of losing a pet or being attacked ourselves or having our children attacked. The government suggests it is unlikely but we have to carry that burden. The reported risks by non government parties do not support the “unlikely” advice.

I founded https://www.coyoteconcernscollingwood.com/  and the FaceBook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/CoyoteConcernsCollingwood/ knowing that this is difficult project. I expect safety in Collingwood and specifically in the immediate area of my property. This is a very important matter to me. It is unconscionable that the Town of Collingwood and OPP have dismissed these concerns. I am willing to take the risk of  retaliation from the Town of Collingwood and Collingwood OPP for my families safety. I could not face the issue of an attack of a family member on my property as I know that coyotes are capable of harm and present at anytime to harm my family.

People need to get engaged in this issue for something to be done.

Petition is a good start.

Email Clerk of Collingwood to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/clerk email salmas@collingwood.ca

Email Collingwood Council members to voice your concerns. http://www.collingwood.ca/council

Very Concerned Collingwood Resident,

Jeff Brown